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A vaccine to preventcervical cancer - different languages (VIC)(fact sheet)

Some types of the human papillomavirus (HPV) have been linked to cervical cancer. A vaccine is now available to protect against two types of HPV that cause around 70 per cent of cervical cancers.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Communicating with health and medical staff, Sexuality issues, Strategies to reduce cancer risk
Targeting: General Public

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
09-07-2015

By: Cancer Council VIC
 

An Abnormal Pap Smear Result - What this means for you? (booklet)

A comprehensive booklet about abnormal results of pap tests and treatment for women.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Strategies to reduce cancer risk
Targeting: General Public, Organisations, staff /or health professionals

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2011

Last updated on this website:
11-06-2015

By: Department of Health & Ageing, Canberra
 

Cervical Cancer (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) fact sheet

This fact sheet provides information on cervical cancer, including symptoms, staging, and treatment.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Disease stages, Treatment options
Targeting: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2014

Last updated on this website:
18-12-2014

By: Cancer Council NSW
 

After a Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer fact sheet (different languages)

Many women feel understandably shocked and upset when told they have cervical cancer. These are natural responses. A diagnosis of cervical cancer affects each woman differently, but for most it will be a difficult time. This Fact sheet includes how cervical cancer is treated, patients' physical and emotional wellbeing and where to get reliable information.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Managing symptoms and side effects, Treatment options
Targeting: Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2014

Last updated on this website:
13-05-2014

By: Cancer Council NSW
 

Understanding your Pap Smear - different languages (NSW)

This fact sheet provides information on why women should have a pap smear, the vaccine for cervical cancer , what is an unsatisfactory pap smear, what an abnormal Pap smear result might mean, how will I know w when to have my next Pap smear, and where to get reliable information. Having a Pap smear every two years offers the best chance of preventing cervical cancer. In 2005, 734 cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed in Australia

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff
Targeting: Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, General Public, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
20-03-2014

By: Cancer Council NSW
 

Pap tests - a little awkward for a lot of peace of mind - poster (VIC)

Most women diagnosed with cervical cancer haven’t had regular Pap tests. It’s essential, even after having the cervical cancer vaccine. If you’re overdue, book a Pap test with your doctor or nurse today.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Strategies to reduce cancer risk
Targeting: General Public

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2013

Last updated on this website:
26-04-2013

By: Cancer Council VIC
 

Abnormal Pap Test Results - different languages (VIC)

The Pap test is a simple test used to check for abnormal changes to the cells of the cervix. If changes are found and treated early, up to 90 per cent of the most common cervical cancers may be prevented.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
05-04-2013

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Pap tests - a way to prevent cervical cancer - different languages (VIC)

Pap tests detect abnormal cells that may be found on the cervix. Pap tests do not pick up cancer, but can find changes that may lead to cancer. Finding changes early means they can be treated well before cancer develops. Pap test should be done every two years. Provides information in English, Arabic, Ahmaric, Chinese, Dinka, Greek, Italian, Khmer, Sudanese, Tagalog/Filipino, Vietnamese

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2011

Last updated on this website:
08-03-2013

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Pap tests after hysterectomy - different languages (VIC)

The Pap test is a simple test used to check for changes to the cells of the cervix that may lead to cervical cancer. This fact sheet provides information about whether you need to have a Pap test after hysterectomy.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2011

Last updated on this website:
08-03-2013

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

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