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Pap tests and women over 70 (VIC)(fact sheet)

If you have had at least two normal Pap test results in the five years before you turn 70, you can stop having Pap tests at 70. You can choose to keep having Pap tests after 70 but the risk of cervical cancer after regular normal Pap tests is small. Information for women in Victoria

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Treatment options
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Pap tests and women over 50 (VIC)(fact sheet)

The Pap test is a simple test used to check for changes to the cells of the cervix that may lead to cervical cancer.All women between the ages of 18 and 70 who have ever been sexually active should have a Pap test every two years. Women who are over 50 and who have reached menopause should keep having Pap tests every two years until the age of 70.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Pap tests and the human papillomavirus (HPV) (VIC)(leaflet)

HPV stands for human papillomavirus, a very common sexually transmitted infection which usually causes no symptoms and goes away by itself, but can sometimes cause serious illnesses. HPV is often picked up by a Pap test. This brochure explains the link between this very common virus and cervical cancer.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Treatment options
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2011

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

HPV and cervical cancer (VIC)(fact sheet)

The human papillomavirus (HPV) affects four out of five people at some time in their lives. It is so common that it is seen as a normal part of being sexually active and usually causes no symptoms and goes away by itself, but can sometimes cause serious illnesses. HPV is often picked up by a Pap test. This brochure explains the link between this very common virus and cervical cancer.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Sexuality issues
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

The Pap test (LARGE PRINT) (VIC)(fact sheet)

The Pap test is a quick and simple test used to screen women for changes to the cells of the cervix that may lead to cervical cancer. Information for Victorian women.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Sexuality issues
Targeting: General Public

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Protect our mob from cervical cancer (Aboriginal)(poster)

A3 poster for Koori women about cervical cancer.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Strategies to reduce cancer risk
Targeting: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2011

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Pap tests after hysterectomy (multi-language)(fact sheet)

The Pap test is a simple test used to check for changes to the cells of the cervix that may lead to cervical cancer. When found early, changes to the cells of the cervix are easy to treat. That is why having a Pap test every two years is so important.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups
Targeting: Partners, family and friends of people with cancer, People with Cancer

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
16-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

The Pap test (VIC) (fact sheet)

The Pap test is a simple test to check for changes to the cells of the cervix that may lead to cervical cancer. A doctor or nurse takes a sample of cells from the cervix and puts them onto a glass slide. The slide is tested at a laboratory. The results are usually available within two weeks.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Sexuality issues
Targeting: General Public

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2012

Last updated on this website:
09-07-2015

By: Cancer Council Victoria
 

Pap tests: the plain facts (VIC)(leaflet)

This booklet is to help you understand more about having a Pap test. A Pap test is to see if your cervix is healthy. If some of the words or pictures are hard to understand be sure to ask for help. Produced as part of PapScreen Victoria’s education and communication initiatives.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Sexuality issues
Targeting: General Public

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2013

Last updated on this website:
09-07-2015

By: Cancer Council VIC
 

HPV testing A guide for women with high-grade abnormal Pap tests (VIC)

Most people will have genital HPV at some time in their life and never know it. Some women only become aware that they have HPV if they have an abnormal Pap test result or if genital warts appear. A Pap test checks for changes to the cells of the cervix. These cell changes are most likely caused by HPV and usually return to normal when the body has cleared the virus. If the changes continue they can be easily treated before they become more serious.

Cancer type: Cervical Cancer
Written for: Women
Focusing on: Check ups, Communicating with GPs, Communicating with health and medical staff, Sexuality issues, Strategies to reduce cancer risk
Targeting: General Public

Year the publication was first published or reviewed:2013

Last updated on this website:
09-07-2015

By: Cancer Council VIC
 

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